Category Archives: Japanese music

Saturday, April 12, 2014, 3PM An Afternoon of Japanese Flute

takagi solo 2002

The Varis Performing Arts Series, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Grafton, MA

To be held in the Kohnstamm Conference Room of the Jean Mayer Administration Building
201 Westboro Road
North Grafton, MA 01536
http://campusmaps.tufts.edu/grafton/

Elizabeth Reian will describe the early history of the shakuhachi, and include a selection of pieces that will range from early to contemporary, including an instrumental piece, Song of the Moon, and City of Lights, by John McDonald; with time for questions at the end.

Fans, come with your cameras and send me some pics! Signed CDs available at the venue.

World Music Concert April 6th , 3PM. Distler Hall, Tufts University

 

4-6-14 WEFT Faculty Concert Poster

 

 This concert will feature members of the world music program from the Tufts Music Department on the Japanese shakuhachi (Elizabeth Reian Bennett), Japanese koto (Cathleen Ayakano Read), Hidustani voice and accompaniment (Warren Senders), ethnic violin (Beth Bahia Cohen), ‘ud (Mal Barsamian), accordion (Michael McClaughlin), banjo (Rich Stillman), and guests.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1389221081354119/?context=create&source=49

Distler Hall, Tufts University.
Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center,
20 Talbot Avenue,
Medford, MA 02155
Directions, PDFs & more:  http://campusmaps.tufts.edu/medford/
Information: 617.627.3679

 

Friday, March 28th 2014, 10:15 PM. Birds in My Heart: Nesting Cranes

wilson above edAs an experiment, Tufts University’s Music Department will have an all-night round of concerts on Friday, March 28th, and this is one. In Japan, Sokaku Reibo, or Nesting Cranes, is usually played in ten to twelve minute excerpts culled from the main piece, as it lasts 45 minutes when played in its entirety.  Multiple repetitions are skipped, as well as major parts of the composition, and the whole nature of the original is essentially unknown. Tufts’ Elizabeth Reian Bennett, shakuhachi Grand Master, will present a first full performance of this piece since the 19th century.

The sacred crane, symbol of happiness, vocalizes and dances throughout the day, and both sexes rear their young. In feudal times, only one crane a year was allowed to be killed, as a gift for a special feast for the emperor. This piece is a description in sound of the calls between the parent cranes and their nestlings, set among the leaping and prancing of the flock, and the lisp and suck of the marsh mud.

To see the cranes go to:

http://www.arkive.org/japanese-crane/grus-japonensis/video-09f.html

3-28-14 Granoff Al Night Music Festival TWiTM Image

Distler Hall, Tufts University.
Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center,
20 Talbot Avenue,
Medford, MA 02155
Directions, PDFs & more:  http://campusmaps.tufts.edu/medford/
Information: 617.627.3679

Upcoming concert on September 15

Three Dimensions: a reunion concert of composers

Sunday, September 15, 2013, 8 PM
Distler Hall, Tufts University. Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center, 20 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155
Directions, PDFs & more: http://campusmaps.tufts.edu/medford/
Information: 617.627.3679

9-15-13 3D poster

The program includes music for medieval flute and shakuhachi, the Japanese traditional flute; Baroque flute, piano and voice; a Baroque flute solo which is not quite a solo; some aleatoric music influenced by ancient Canadian and Japanese traditions; a piece for two pianos; songs for two sopranos and piano, and more songs to texts by Pablo Neruda, accompanied by percussion and Baroque flute – a varied program that brings together sonorities from around the world.

I will play a premiere by John McDonald for medieval flute (Na’ama Lion) and shakuhachi, called “Tuk”, as in missi-tuk, the Mystic River, which flows near us here. The other composers are Jorge Ibanez, Atsushi Yoshinaka and David Claman.

The Art and Flow of Aikido

I had a lot of fun doing the sound for this film, “The Art and Flow of Aikido”, by Aikido instructor Ted Goodman, who teaches in the area. Ted approached me to do this three years ago, but the project went no further. Then he came to my performance at Tufts University in April and said  he was ready to record me. In the event, we did our high tech recording in a few short sessions by placing a microphone on a low stool,  accompanied by Ted’s hypoallergenic dog, who kindly remained silent during the process. Ed Keith, a student of Ted’s, edited the sound.

The film is to be broadcast on the Arlington, MA Community Media Television in July 2013.  See the schedule at acmi.tv